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TaniaJames on the radio hour [1pm] today, artxfm.com

Tania James was raised in Louisville, Kentucky and lives with her husband and son in Washington DC.

Her debut novel Atlas of Unknownswas published by Knopf in 2009, and was a New York Times Editor’s Choice, an Indie Next Notable, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and a Best Book of 2009 for The San Francisco Chronicle and NPR. Her story collectionAerogrammes, also published by Knopf, was a Best Book of 2012 for Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal, andThe San Francisco Chronicle. Her stories have appeared in Boston Review, Granta, Kenyon Review, One Story, and A Public Space. Two stories from Aerogrammes were finalists for Best American Short Stories 2008 and 2013.

Tania is the recipient of fellowships from the Ragdale Foundation and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. From 2011-2012, she was a Fulbright fellow to India living in New Delhi.Tania-James-1014-037-BW-1024x682

Tania will be in person at Carmichael’s Bookstore tonight [7pm] for a reading and book signing.

Check out her website HERE 

 

The Tusk That Did the Damage

A tour de force set in South India that plumbs the moral complexities of the ivory trade through the eyes of a poacher, a documentary filmmaker, and, in a feat of audacious imagination, an infamous elephant known as the Gravedigger.

Orphaned by poachers as a calf and sold into a life of labor and exhibition, the Gravedigger breaks free of his chains and begins terrorizing the countryside, earning his name from the humans he kills and then buries. Manu, the studious younger son of a rice farmer, loses his cousin to the Gravedigger’s violence and is drawn, with his wayward brother Jayan, into the sordid, alluring world of poaching. Emma is a young American working on a documentary with her college best friend, who witnesses the porous boundary between conservation and corruption and finds herself in her own moral gray area: a risky affair with the veterinarian who is the film’s subject. As the novel hurtles toward its tragic climax, these three storylines fuse into a wrenching meditation on love and betrayal, duty and loyalty, and the vexed relationship between man and nature.

With lyricism and suspense, Tania James animates the rural landscapes where Western idealism clashes with local reality; where a farmer’s livelihood can be destroyed by a rampaging elephant; where men are driven to poaching. In James’ arrestingly beautiful prose, The Tusk That Did the Damage blends the mythical and the political to tell a wholly original, utterly contemporary story about the majestic animal, both god and menace, that has mesmerized us for centuries.

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ArtFM Radio hour: March 5.2015 : Nettie Farris : Matthew Haughton : Jonathan Wood

Tune in HERE this Thursday 1pm EST

Readings and Q&A with Nettie Farris and Matthew Haughton

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Musical interludes by Jonathan Wood

When you dig it:  You can then see them collaborate LIVE at Subterranean Phrases

on March 11 @ Decca [812 e. market st ] EVENT PAGE HERE

Subterranean Phrases is a reading series that matches writers and musicians to perform unrehearsed collaborations creating interesting juxtapositions of verbal and musical phrases. It’s subterranean in the cellar lounge at Decca Restaurant.

Can’t wait until March 11th to hear some incredible local readings?  I don’t blame you. Fear not. the Portland Poetry Series happens on MONDAY, March 2ND @ McQuixote Books and Coffee with 4 FOUR outstanding writers. 

Amber Burns : Adam Day : Jeremy Clark : Yolantha Harrison-Pace

Epiphany 

EVENT PAGE HERE 

All bios below


Nettie Farris is the author of Communion (Accents Publishing, 2013). She teaches writing as an adjunct instructor and has earned a Distinguished Teaching Award from the College of Arts and Sciences University of Louisville. She has won first place prizes in both Graduate Poetry and Graduate Research from the Metroversity Writing Contest. In 2011 she received the Kudzu Poetry Prize. Her poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She lives in Floyds Knobs, Indiana. Her chapbook, Fat Crayons, is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press.

Matthew Haughton’s latest book of poetry is “Stand in the Stillness of Woods” (WordTech Editions). His chapbook, “Bee-coursing Box” (Accents Publications) was nominated for the Weatherford Award for Appalachian Poetry Book of the Year. His poems have appeared in many journals including Appalachian Heritage, The Four Way Review, Still, Border Crossing, and The Louisville Review. He is currently a student at the Bread Loaf School of English, where he is on a generous fellowship from the C.E. and S. Foundation. Haughton works as a school teacher in his native Kentucky.

http://jonathanglenwood.bandcamp.com/

From songwriter to improviser, Jonathan Glen Wood answers creativity’s call with openness and honesty, seeking clarity on an important inner journey. Whether performing with Old Baby, Jaye Jayle, Lowe Sutherland or Catherine Irwin, Wood strives to find new modes of creative expression, which lead to new musical possibilities. After a wide range of solo releases in 2014 ultimately uniting folk songwriting and synthesizer tones, he’s started 2015 by releasing, “On Remembering,” a wholly instrumental ambient synthesizer affair.


Amber Burns was born and raised in Louisville, KY. She earned her BA in English and Pan-African Studies from the University of Louisville. Amber first began performing her poetry in 2008 as a member of the feminist choreo-poetry troupe, S.H.E.! (Solidifying Her Evolution). She is now a seasoned poet and uses the stage as a platform to discuss the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. Amber is the Assistant Director of New Roots, Inc., a Louisville based non-profit working to make fresh local food affordable for those who need it most.

Jeremy Clark was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky. He recently graduated from the University of Louisville with a degree in Pan-African Studies. In 2014, he was chosen to attend the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and his work is forthcoming in PLUCK! and Callaloo.

Adam Day’s forthcoming collection is Model of City in Civil War (Sarabande Books, April 2015). He is the recipient of a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship for Badger, Apocrypha, and of a PEN Emerging Writers Award. His work has appeared in the Boston Review, American Poetry Review, Poetry London, The Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He coordinates The Baltic Writing Residency in Latvia, Scotland, and Bernheim Arboretum & Research Forest.

Yolantha Harrison-Pace was born in Tacoma, Washington, but lived her early childhood in Amarillo, Texas during segregation until her family moved to Champaign, Illinois in 1966. There integration became a part of her everyday life, often just because her family of 7 attended an event or she and one of her 4 brothers were the only African American student in the classroom. This unique legacy of having lived on both sides of the track, segregation and integration, has been influential in her love for and artistic portrayals of her precious home, America. Pace uses her art forms as tools and strategies for supporting her platform of unity through the pursuit of cultural excellence. Her focus group emphasis is underserved populations in America and beyond. Yolantha is an advocate for abused family members, especially concerning hate crimes against women and children. She has been a Children’s Ambassador for Haiti since the year 2000. She is a teaching artist, playwright, poet and author and has had her play THE WHOLE SKY premier at Berea College. Her multitude of writings have gleaned her such honors as Poet of the Year, Book of Poetry of the Year, and won her the personal accolade of Humanitarian Author of the year. Her works have gone international through her postings as an adjunct writer for University of Southern California’s Art Institute for Genetic Medicine. In addition, as an Urban Folk Artist, Pace’s primitive Angel dolls are owned by collectors around the world. Her newest release: UNCLE THAXTER is a children’s book celebrating friends and family of wounded warriors.

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INKY+AXTON SERIES+LANCE G>NEWMAN on the radio hour [2.12.15]

The spring season of the Axton Reading Series kicks off this Thursday, 3pm, at the University of Louisville.

Sayed Kashua is the author of three novels: Dancing Arabs, Let it Be Morning and Person Singular, winner of the Berstein Prize. Kashua also writes a satirical weekly column in Hebrew for the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz. In a humorous, tongue-in-cheek style, Kashua addresses the problems faced by Arabs in Israel, caught between two worlds. He is the writer and creator of the hit Israeli TV show Arab Labor(Avoda Aravit), now in its third season. In 2004 Kashua was awarded the Prime Minister’s Prize in Literature. He is also the subject of the documentary Forever Scared.

Kashua’s presentation at UofL is entitled “The Foreign Mother Tongue: Living and Writing as a Palestinian in Israel.” His visit is co-sponsored by the Program in Judaic Studies in the Division of Humanities.

Presentation: Thursday, 2/12, 3:00PM-5:00PM, Chao Auditorium, Ekstrom Library

Master Class: Friday, 2/13, 10:00Am-Noon, Bingham Humanities 300



Lynn MelnickDeborah Bernhardt, and Jeremy Clark read for the InKY Reading Series this Friday the 13th (sponsored by Louisville Literary Arts) at The Bard’s Town, beginning 7 pm.

LYNN MELNICK is the author of If I Should Say I Have Hope (YesYes Books, 2012) and the co-editor, with Brett Fletcher Lauer, of Please Excuse This Poem: 100 New Poets for the Next Generation (Viking, 2015). Her poetry has appeared in The New Republic, The Paris Review, A Public Space, and elsewhere. Her fiction has appeared in Opium and Forklift, Ohio and she has written essays and book reviews for Boston Review, Coldfront, LA Review of Books, and Poetry Daily, among others.

DEBORAH BERNHARDT is the author of Driftology (New Michigan Press/DIAGRAM, 2013) and Echolalia (Four Way Books, 2006). Her poetry has appeared in American Letters & Commentary, Barrow Street, columbia poetry review, Court Green, Cue, Fence, Free Verse, New American Writing, The Offending Adam, Trickhouse, TYPO, Verse Daily, Volt, and elsewhere.

JEREMY CLARK was born and raised west of the 9th Street Divide. He recently graduated from the University of Louisville with a degree in Pan-African Studies. In 2014, he was chosen to attend the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and his work is forthcoming in PLUCK! and Callaloo.


Thursday, on the radio hour on artxfm.com, I’ll be chatting with Lance G. Newman, 1pm EST

Lance G. Newman, also known as Mr. SpreadtheLove. is a poet, spoken word artist, instructor, community advocate, and performance art host who has been working diligently at receiving grants for his community project: SpreadLovEnterprise. He hosts workshops and events for healing and creativity:

Poetry Workshops!!!

SpreadLove
Resource
Center…
Educational Articles
Blog Talk
Word Play (Activities)
& More!!!

WHY & HOW…

“Children and adults alike enthusiastically embrace poetry through SpreadLove poetry workshops. Dissecting both written & oral tradition Mr. SpreadLove, Lance G Newman II, instructors his students to read and write poetry with a greater understanding of poetical devices.

Exploration of poetical devices such as: wordplay, alliteration, personification, metaphors, satire among many other techniques are used to compose original works.  After participants compose their written poetry they are able to learn memorization and stage presence techniques.

Spoken-word poetry derives from folklore which is the art of storytelling. Not only has humanity’s history been vividly recorded by such method but challenging qualms and also affirmations of hope. Spreadlove is certain that you have a story to share.”

Tune in to artFm on Thursday at 1pm to hear about the status on the grant proposal, some spoken word pieces, and how he’s keeping louisville Literary.

Kentucky Writing Workshop–February 6 + Plus events in LOUisVille,PORTLand, BLOOMington

How do I get published?

How do I pitch to an agent?

How do I find an agent?

What should my marketing strategy be?

If you have these questions and more, consider attending this year’s KY writing Workshop.  All details can be found HERE

This is a special one-day “How to Get Published” writing workshop on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015, at the Holiday Inn Louisville East. In other words, it’s one day full of classes and advice designed to give you the best instruction concerning how to get your writing & books published. We’ll discuss your publishing opportunities today, how to write queries & pitches, how to market yourself and your books, what makes an agent/editor stop reading your manuscript, and more. No matter what you’re writing — fiction or nonfiction — the day’s classes will help point you in the right direction. Writers of all genres are welcome.

This event is designed to squeeze as much into one day of learning as possible. You can ask any questions you like during the classes, and get your specific concerns addressed. We will have literary agents onsite to give feedback and take pitches from writers, as well. This year’s faculty so far includes agent Natalia Aponte (Aponte Literary), agent Alice Speilburg (Speilburg Literary), agent Brent Taylor (TriadaUS Literary), agent Victoria Lea (Aponte Literary), and editor JD DeWitt (River Valley Publishing).

Chuck Sambuchino (chucksambuchino.com,@chucksambuchino) of Writer’s Digest Books is the editor of Guide to Literary Agents as well as the Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market. His authored books include Formatting & Submitting Your ManuscriptCreate Your Writer Platform, which was praised by Forbes.com; andHow to Survive a Garden Gnome Attack, which was optioned for film by Sony. He oversees one of the biggest blogs in publishing (the Guide to Literary Agents Blog) as well as one of the biggest Twitter accounts in publishing (@WritersDigest). He is a freelance editor who has seen dozens of his clients get agents and/or book deals, and he has presented at almost 90 writing conferences and events over the past eight years.


Current Events:

Tomorrow, January 29th, in Louisville

Pyro Gallery, Double Vision readings (continued) scroll down to previous blog post for more details.


Tomorrow, January 29, in Bloomington, IN

This feature reading is a mix of new and experienced voices showcasing a breadth of poetic styles and voices. There will be a short open mic to begin the show, so get there early to sign up. Open mic slots will be up to five minutes.

Featuring:
Donna Mikayla Mundy
Laura Brikmanis
Bradley K Meyer from Dayton, OH
and Ian Uriel Girdley


Monday, February 2nd, in Portland
The third installment of the Portland Poetry Series is here. This month we explore the theme “Anechoic”, or that without an echo. The concept came from the feeling of existing in a cityscape during the cold winter months, the sound of everything and nothing.

We are settling into our new time slot on the first Monday of each month this go round with four excellent poets. As always we will also include a “Reading from the Canon” to set the mood for the evening. There will also be three five-minute open mic poetry spots for those that would like to present something they’ve been working on.

Our featured poets this month are Maree Ecrevan, Lange G. Newman, II, Rosella Pearl, and Dru Longhofer.


More Double Vision interviews [1.22.15] Plus Holler, Lexington on Wednesday

PYRO Gallery pairs artists and poets in Double Vision Exhibit


‘Pyro Gallery will exhibit the collaborative works of 16 of their member artists paired with 16 local poets in Double Vision, opening at the gallery, 909 E. Market, Friday January 9, 6 – 9 PM and running through February 15.

In addition to the exhibition, there will be an exhibit catalogue. A series of literary readings/ conversations between poets and artists will be held Thursday evenings January 22, 29 and February 5 at 7 PM at the gallery. And local high school and university teachers have been invited to bring their classes to visit the gallery in a hands-on experience where several of the works invite participation and ongoing dialogue about the art/poetry collaborations.

The finished works range from an installation where visitors are invited to add their own words to form new poems in a hybrid between a Shinto shrine and Native American prayer sticks, to photography, printmaking, and a large scale fabric enclosure of image and text.

“The collaboration between artists and poets is testament to the myriad ways in which people can come together through art,” said the exhibition’s curator, Jeff Skinner, PYRO member and recent winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship. “The resulting works are varied and exhilarating: witty, intense, provocative, and profound,” he added.

“Because art making is often a solitary endeavor,” said PYRO’s administrative director, Susie Harrison, “ Double Vision offered artists the opportunity to travel outside studio routines and familiar creative processes to engage in a word and image, free-form partner dance across creative art forms.”

“We hope Double Vision serves as a counter-point to our product driven culture by placing great emphasis on process and collaboration,” said Harrison. “Some pairs met and shared meals together, others took road trips. Each pair discovered and lived their own definition of collaboration.”’

Thursday January 22nd, 1pm on artxfm.com I will be chatting with these collaborative pairs.
Sean Patrick Hill/John McCarthy
Makalani Bandele /Wendy Smith
Martha Greenwald/Susie Harrison
John McCarthy is an artist, ceramic sculptor, and art educator. His sculptural pieces are hand-built and highly manipulated to create organic shapes with an emphasis on texture and subtle, naturally glazed surfaces.  McCarthy has used stoneware firings to produce one-of-a-kind compositions that are striking and durable, whether used indoors or as exterior garden sculpture.

Makalani Bandele is a Louisville, KY native. A member of the Affrilachian Poets and a Cave Canem fellow, his work is forthcoming or can be found in print or online in literary magazines and journals such as Sou’wester, Barely South Review, The New Sound, Louisville Review, The Platte Valley Review, and Prime Number Magazine. He is a 2012 and 2013 Pushcart prize nominee, Ernest Sandeen Poetry Prize and Literary LEO 1st Prize in Poetry winner. Hellfightin’, published by Willow Books in 2011, is his first full-length book of poems.


Wendi Smith, an artist and teacher has worked in both fields for over 30 years.   Her experience as a teacher of design, drawing, and painting at Bellarmine College and Indiana University Southeast has informed her own work.Primarily a painter, Smith combines painting with 3 dimensional objects to create columns, boxes and prayer wheels.  The dominant themes in her work are nature and ritual.She is a member of PYRO Gallery in Louisville, Kentucky, and her work has been exhibited in venues throughout the region, including the Midwest Museum of American Art, Elkhart, IN, the Carnegie Center,Covington, KY, The New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art, and the Yeiser Art Center, Paducah, KY

Martha Greenwald’s collection of poems, Other Prohibited Items, was the winner of the 2010 Mississippi Review Poetry Series.   Her work has appeared in The Threepenny Review, Slate, Poetry, Best New Poets, The Sycamore Review, Shenandoah, and is forthcoming in New World Writing.  She has held a Wallace Stegner Fellowshipat Stanford and been awarded scholarships from both the Breadloaf and Sewanee Writers Conferences.  Greenwald has also held an Al Smith Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council. Works in progress include Shivah Bullies, a memoir, and Well, Bless His Heart, a collection of short fiction. She has taught in the Englissh Department at the University of Louisville since 1999.

 Over the next few weeks, PYRO will be hosting readings  as follows:

Thursday 1/22, PYRO Gallery, 7pm 

Kristen Miller, Fred Smock. William Smith, Ellyn Lichvar, David Harrity

Thursday 1/29, PYRO Gallery, 7pm 

Sarah Gorham, Lynnell Edwards, Makalani Bandele, Annette Allen, Michael Estes

Thursday 2/5, PYRO Gallery, 7pm 

Sean Patrick Hill, Martha Greenwald, Adam Day, John James, Kathryn Welsh

Also this week, in Lexington, The Holler Poets Series
2015 begins with our 80th show! Featuring the debut of open mic fave and member of The Twenty, Jaria Nicole Gordon and the return of WKU professor, Tom C Hunley, celebrating his latest, Scotch Tape World. Providing music is Denver’s experimental outsider folk artist, Stephen Molyneux. Bring some extra dollars for the holler bucket so we can gas up our performers’ vehicles. Open mic kicks it off at 8p and closes the show. See y’all there!
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Double Vision at PYRO gallery & The Kentucky Writing Workshop

This past Friday was the opening reception for Double Vision at PYRO Gallery. A group show featuring 17 Artist/Writer pairs and their collaborative work.  Almost every medium is represented from sculpture and ceramic to oil and digital collage.  Some of the writings are placed on the wall close to the visual representation, some are incorporated within the piece, in a block of text, while others are incorporated line by line or poem by poem by being draped across, tied, or affixed with a decoupage.  Over the next few weeks, PYRO will be hosting readings of the pieces as follows:

Thursday 1/22, PYRO Gallery, 7pm 

Kristen Miller, Fred Smock. William Smith, Ellyn Lichvar, David Harrity

Thursday 1/29, PYRO Gallery, 7pm 

Sarah Gorham, Lynnell Edwards, Makalani Bandele, Annette Allen, Michael Estes

Thursday 2/5, PYRO Gallery, 7pm 

Sean Patrick Hill, Martha Greenwald, Adam Day, John James, Kathryn Welsh

Keep Louisville Literary will be hosting some of these Writer/Artist pairs on the radio hour on ArtFM for an in-depth discussion about their collaborative process.

This Thursday January 15, 1pm on artxfm.com
Kay Grubola/Lynell Edwards
CJ Pressma
Jeff Skinner/Jessica Farquhr/Adam Day

Kay Polson Grubola is an artist and independent curator in Louisville, Kentucky. Creating assemblages using natural found objects, Grubola’s work is a celebration of nature. The work is also an allegory for the natural process of human life, both its ascendance and its decline. She has shown her work nationally and internationally.

Grubola was the Executive Director of Nazareth Arts, a regional arts center on the campus of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth in Kentucky, as well as the Artistic Director of the Louisville Visual Art Association.  For 10 years she taught drawing and printmaking at Bellarmine University and Indiana University Southeast.

An active curator Grubola has organized many exhibitions in a wide range of topics.  Her exhibits have ranged in subject matter from original concept drawings from the design studios of GM, Chrysler and Ford muscle car era to a nationally recognized extravaganza of handmade dinnerware and exquisite table design, which wowed audiences for more than 20 years.


Lynnell Major Edwards is the author of three collections of poetry, most recentlyCovet (October, 2011), and also The Farmer’s Daughter (2003) and The Highwayman’s Wife (2007), all from Red Hen Press.  Her short fiction and book reviews have appeared most recently in Connecticut Review, American Book Review, Pleiades, New Madrid, and others. She lives in Louisville, Kentucky where, since 2010 she has been president of  Louisville Literary Arts, a non-profit literary arts organization that sponsors the monthly InKY reading series and The Writer’s Block Festival. She is also Associate Professor of English at Spalding University.  She also teaches creative writing at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and is available for readings and workshops in a variety of settings.


C.J. Pressma is a graduate of Antioch College and holds an  M.F.A. in Photography from Indiana University.  He studied as a special graduate student with Minor White at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and with Henry Holmes Smith at Indiana University.

In 1970 he founded the Center for Photographic Studies – an alternative school of creative photography.  The Center provided a learning experience for those seeking to explore photography as creative expression.  During its eight-year existence the center attracted students from over 35 states and foreign countries to its full-time resident program and provided part-time instruction and darkroom access for hundreds of students in the Louisville metropolitan area.  Its two galleries provided monthly photographic exhibits featuring the works of local, regional, and internationally acclaimed photographic artists including Ansel Adams and Minor White.

In 1978 he was awarded a National Endowment Fellowship in Photography.

In 1979 Pressma embarked on a career as a multimedia producer and marketing communications specialist. In 1984, his seven part series Witness to the Holocaust, was released in the U.S. and Canada where it remains in distribution today.  One of the first productions to use survivor interviews as the exclusive content to tell the story of the Holocaust, Witness to the Holocaust has received numerous national awards.

In 1997 he was awarded the American Advertising Federation’s prestigious Silver Medal Award for “outstanding contributions to advertising and furthering the industry’s standards, creative excellence, and responsibility in areas of social concern.”

In December,2001 Pressma was awarded a Fellowship by  the Kentucky  Arts council.

Pressma is represented by Pyro Gallery in Louisville.


Poet, playwright, and essayist Jeffrey Skinner’s most recent book (memoir, advice, humor), The 6.5 Practices of Moderately Successful Poets, was published to wide attention and acclaim, including a full page positive review in the July 19, 2012 Sunday New York Times Book Review.  His most recent collection of poems,Glaciology, was chosen in 2012 as winner in the Crab Orchard Open Poetry Competition, and will be published by Southern Illinois University press in Fall, 2013.   Skinner has published five previous collections: Late Stars (Wesleyan University Press), A Guide to Forgetting (a winner in the 1987 National Poetry series, chosen by Tess Gallagher, published by Graywolf Press), The Company of Heaven (Pitt Poetry Series), Gender Studies, (Miami University Press), and Salt Water Amnesia (Ausable Press).  He has edited two anthologies, Last Call: Poems of Alcoholism, Addiction, and Deliverance; and Passing the Word: Poets and Their Mentors.  His numerous chapbooks include Salt Mother, Animal Dad, which was chosen by C.K. Williams for the New York City Center for Book Arts Poetry Competition in 2005.  Over the years Skinner’s poems have appeared in most of the country’s  premier literary magazines, including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, The American Poetry Review, Poetry, FENCE, Bomb, DoubleTake, and The Georgia, Iowa, and Paris Reviews.

Also a playwright, Skinner’s play Down Range had a successful limited run at Theatre 3 in New York City in the Spring of 2009, and will again be produced in Chicago in 2012-13.  His play Dream On had its premier production in February of 2007, by the Cardboard Box Collaborative Theatre in Philadelphia.  Other of Skinner’s plays have been finalists in the Eugene O’Neill Theater Conference competition, and winners in various play contests.

Skinner’s writing has gathered grants, fellowships, and awards from such sources as the National Endowment for the Arts (1986, & 2006), the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the Howard Foundation, and the state arts agencies of Connecticut, Delaware, and Kentucky.  He has been awarded residencies at Yaddo, McDowell, Vermont Studios, and the Fine Arts Center in Provincetown.  His work has been featured numerous times on National Public Radio.  In 2002 Skinner served as Poet-in-Residence at the James Merrill House in Stonington, Connecticut.

He is President of the Board of Directors, and Editorial Consultant, for Sarabande Books, a literary publishing house he cofounded with his wife, poet Sarah Gorham.  He teaches creative writing and English at The University of Louisville.


Jessica Farquhar holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Purdue where she was the assistant director of Creative Writing. She is a Louisville native, and current resident. Her poems have appeared in Catch Up, Word Hotel, ABZ, Transom, New Madrid, Poetry East, and Lumberyard; reviews and interviews in Sycamore Review.

Adam Day was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky.  He received his MFA in creative writing at New York University, where he was poetry editor for the program’s national literary journal, Washington Square. His work has been published or is forthcoming in The American Poetry ReviewColumbia: A Journal of Literature and the ArtsCrab Orchard Review,Seattle Review, and others.
Thursday January 22nd, 1pm on artxfm.com
Sean Patrick Hill/John McCarthy
Makalani Bandele /Wendy Smith
Martha Greenwald/Susie Harrison
Bio’s posted in next week’s blog 

Another opportunity to workshop in Louisville is on the Horizon with The Kentucky Writing Workshop. “..A special one-day “How to Get Published” writing workshop on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015, at the Holiday Inn Louisville East.”

In addition to the instructional courses, 5 different literary agents will be in attendance taking pitches for books & novels.

All information about agents, workshops, and registration available HERE

Chuck Sambuchino will be on Keep Louisville Literary on January 29th to discuss the event.

Chuck Sambuchino (chucksambuchino.com,@chucksambuchino) of Writer’s Digest Books is the editor of Guide to Literary Agents as well as the Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market. His authored books include Formatting & Submitting Your ManuscriptCreate Your Writer Platform, which was praised by Forbes.com; andHow to Survive a Garden Gnome Attack, which was optioned for film by Sony. He oversees one of the biggest blogs in publishing (the Guide to Literary Agents Blog) as well as one of the biggest Twitter accounts in publishing (@WritersDigest). He is a freelance editor who has seen dozens of his clients get agents and/or book deals, and he has presented at almost 90 writing conferences and events over the past eight years.

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Selena McCracken reports on “The Dark Lady of the Sonnets” and Pyro Gallery opens with Double Vision on Friday

Press Release: Double Vision 

PYRO Gallery pairs artists and poets in Double Vision Exhibit

Pyro Gallery will exhibit the collaborative works of 16 of their member artists paired with 16 local poets in Double Vision, opening at the gallery, 909 E. Market, Friday January 9, 6 – 9 PM and running through February 15.

In addition to the exhibition, there will be an exhibit catalogue. A series of literary readings/ conversations between poets and artists will be held Thursday evenings January 22, 29 and February 5 at 7 PM at the gallery. And local high school and university teachers have been invited to bring their classes to visit the gallery in a hands-on experience where several of the works invite participation and ongoing dialogue about the art/poetry collaborations.

The finished works range from an installation where visitors are invited to add their own words to form new poems in a hybrid between a Shinto shrine and Native American prayer sticks, to photography, printmaking, and a large scale fabric enclosure of image and text.

“The collaboration between artists and poets is testament to the myriad ways in which people can come together through art,” said the exhibition’s curator, Jeff Skinner, PYRO member and recent winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship. “The resulting works are varied and exhilarating: witty, intense, provocative, and profound,” he added.

“Because art making is often a solitary endeavor,” said PYRO’s administrative director, Susie Harrison, “ Double Vision offered artists the opportunity to travel outside studio routines and familiar creative processes to engage in a word and image, free-form partner dance across creative art forms.”

“We hope Double Vision serves as a counter-point to our product driven culture by placing great emphasis on process and collaboration,” said Harrison. “Some pairs met and shared meals together, others took road trips. Each pair discovered and lived their own definition of collaboration.”

PYRO Double Vision Exhibit                

The poet /artist pairs are:

POETS                          ARTISTS

Bill Smith                   Keith Auerbach

John James              Carrie Burr

Erin Keane                Beverly Glascock      

Lynnell Edwards       Kay Polson Grubola  

Martha Greenwald    Susan Harrison

Sarah Gorham           Paula Keppie

Jessica Farquhar       Jeff Skinner  

Kathryn Welsh           Bob Lockhart

Ellyn Lichvar              Debra Lott  

Sean Patrick Hill         John McCarthy

Michael Estes           Mike McCarthy      

Annette Allen            Susan Moffett    

Kristen Miller              Corie Neumayer

Fred Smock            James (Chip) Norton

David Harrity             C.J. Pressma

Adam Day              Jeff Skinner

Makalani Bandele  Wendi Smith

“Pyro is so pleased to have had the opportunity to work with so much of the literary talent of Louisville and hope we can continue with these kinds of collaborations,” Harrison added.

PYRO is an artist owned and operated gallery with 19 current members. Working in many different styles and media, a diverse group of professional artist members guarantees a lively assortment of work to visitors and collectors.

For additional information contact Paula Keppie at 502-883-0722, or at paulakkeppie@gmail.com.

 

Ignite. Excite. Inspire.

PYRO Gallery

909 East Market Street, Louisville, KY 40206

For information and directions: (502) 587-0106

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Keep Louisville Literary will be hosting several of the collaborative pairs on the radio hour to chat about their process.

Thursday January 15, 1pm on artxfm.com
Kay Grubola/Lynell Edwards
CP Pressma
Jeff Skinner/Jessica Farquhr/Adam Day
Thursday January 22nd, 1pm on artxfm.com
Sean Patrick Hill/John McCarthy
Makalani Bandele /Wendy Smith
Martha Greenwald/Susie Harrison

-Selena McCracken reports:

“On January 6th, Kentucky Shakespeare performed the one act play “The Dark Lady of the Sonnets” by George Bernard Shaw at the Kentucky Center and Louisville Public Media was there to record it. Matt Wallace, Producing Artistic Director, told the audience what’s in store for us this year. I’m excited about the “Shakespeare on Stage” Film Series at Baxter Avenue Theater and “Shakespeare in the Library,” for which two actors will read “Tempest” at all eighteen public library locations. He mentioned original, Shakespeare-inspired plays written by Theatre 502 and The Bard’s Town Theatre. “Macbeth” is coming to the Iriquois Ampitheater in the spring and the three plays we’ll see in Central Park this summer are “The Tempest,” “The Taming of the Shrew,” and “Macbeth”. “Late Night Shakes” will feature Louisville Improvisers after the play ends.

Next, the audience was invited to participate in the recording! We gasped and cheered on cue while the actors read a short, funny promotion for the play. To save on air time, we did everything a second time only much faster. Finally, Matt Wallace signaled to record while playing “The Beefeater” guard. The accents were flawless. That and “The Lady” (Queen Elizabeth I’s) red royal cloak was all it took to create the imagination of Whitehall. Abigail Bailey Maupin played a beautiful and frightening Virgin Queen. Gregory Maupin played the bard William Shakespeare, son of an alderman, who was waiting to meet with his lover, “The Dark Lady”. You know the one, with the wiry black hair, reeking breath and dull voice. “The Dark Lady” was played by Megan Masse who possessed none of those traits. Her suffering is somehow hilarious as Shakespeare blatantly ignores her to flatter the queen. “The Dark Lady,” who has often inspired reflections on the concept of true love, was not at all impressed by the sonnets about her. In fact, she had come to meet Shakespeare only to break up with him before he became so distracted by the Queen. Naturally, his romantic insinuations nearly got him executed, but it was gradually revealed that Shakespeare’s real opportunity was in convincing the Queen to consider funding a national theater for his plays, which he did. George Bernard Shaw wrote this play as part of a campaign to open a “Shakespeare National Theater” in 1916. It was quite an exhilarating unraveling when suddenly this tremendous feat of Kentucky Shakespeare came to an end.

It’s essential to mention that Kyle Ware utilized an entire table full of carefully selected random objects with which to create sound effects for the radio. There was much boot stomping and bell dinging and he had to slap his own face like 10 times. It was very special for me to see that again, because I voted for Le Petomane’s radio serial play “Gladys…of Adenture!” during the “Festival of Shorts” in which it debuted, but I never could get to another episode. It’s fascinating when the actors can create an environment that is engaging and entertaining on so many levels. Place and Time get spectacularly compounded and warped, especially in this adaptation of Shaw’s Shakespeare play, especially with Matt Wallace’s Beefeater accent. Add to that the fact that “The Dark Lady of the Sonnets” was actually recorded live for Louisville public radio and you might get why I was so charmed by the experience. Now we all get to be excited to finally listen to the podcast later this year! See you in the park!”

write on,
Rachel Short
keeplouisvilleliteary@yahoo.com