Ryan Ridge + American Homes

ryan ridge.pngRyan Ridge is the author of the story collection Hunters & Gamblers, the poetry collection Ox, as well as the chapbooks 22nd Century Man and Hey, it’s America. His next book, American Homes, is forthcoming from the University of Michigan Press as part of their new 21st Century Prose series. His work can be found in places like PANK, Salt Hill, Tin House, McSweeney’s Small Chair, FLAUNT Magazine, The Santa Monica Review, Sleepingfish, and others. A former editor for Faultline Journal of Arts & Letters, Bull and others, he currently serves as a managing editor for Juked (http://www.juked.com). Ridge holds a BA in English from the University of Louisville and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of California, Irvine.

Join us on 97.1 fm [Louisville] Tuesday Morning, 9am, to hear excerpts from the book. As we discuss Ryan’s writing and the inspiration that comes from the Union of states in which we reside, we might come to the conclusion of our greatness or our impending doom.

wXoXReMixGray8Not in Louisville, KY? no worries! stream live at artxfm.com

“Ryan Ridge inflects his anatomy of suburban interiors with a madcap, panoptic conceptualist idiom, and his readers will be left feeling they never gave nearly enough thought to the stuff that real, lived life comprises: walls, floors, doors, windows, garages, sheds, attics and basements. Ostensibly a tongue-in-cheek meditation satirizing the homogenization of contemporary domestic space, American Homes develops a truly heterogeneous literary architecture founded on the basis of formal dynamism and linguistic play.”––Evan Lavender-Smith
AMERICAN HOMES
“Ridge’s book explores the contradictions inherent in ideals of affluence and ownership, and does so admirably, without edging into sourness or satirical revenge killing. The humor is affable, and odd. Somewhere between Demetri Martin and Steven Wright, Jacques Tati and Wes Anderson, Ramon Gomez de la Serna and Georges Perec.”–Kyle Coma-Thompson, Electric Lit

To see more reviews and make a purchase, browse his catalogue, or simply give the website some hits, please visit: HIS WEBSITE HERE 

After you listen to the Radio hour, you may be so inspired that you would like to study craft with Ryan. YOU CAN= Saturday, March 12th

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS:
A CRAFT CLASS WITH
RYAN RIDGE
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2016
9:30 AM to Noon
PYRO GALLERY
900 E. MARKET STREET, LOUISVILLE, KY
$30 per persons
In this workshop, with prose stylist Ryan Ridge, participants will explore works by Ron Carlson, Elizabeth Tallent, and Ernest Hemingway with an eye toward their inventive use of objects to tell a story. Using this prose as inspiration, writers will create their own “set piece” story–one in which the smallest of salient details can have big, big meaning. The workshop may also appeal to poets looking to write short prose.
Pre-registration required
Log-on to Louisville Literary Arts’ website Scroll down to find the Pay Pal button!

UP next on keep Louisville Literary: Mackenzie Berry, organizer of the “Young Poets of Louisville” organization [March 15th]

Plus ++ Christopher McCurry [March 29th]

If you would like to appear on the radio hour, Contact Rachel Short at keeplouisvilleliterary@yahoo.com

show FLYER

 

Write on,

Rachel Short

 

 

 

Thursday [4.17.14] on artxFM.com: David Grubbs discusses “Records Ruin the Landscape” with Keep Louisville Literary

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David Grubbs, an integral member of the Louisville music scene for decades with bands:Squirrel Bait Youth, Bastro, and Gastr Del Sol, went on to study music to the dissertation level and has since churned out a book integral to the music scene at large. 

“Records Ruin Landscapes” explores the life and death effects that the process of recording has on music.  From Cagean chance music, indeterminacy to popular forms, what does it mean to capture a single occurrence of a moment in time?  What affect does owning a hard copy have on how we listen and experience music?  What is gained and what is lost?  John Cage, from whom the title of the book is derived, hated the concept of recording, and felt it countered the entire purpose and philosophy of chance, indeterminacy, and the I-ching  from which the main body of his work was based.  Cage wasn’t alone, most avant-garde composers of the 60s and free-improv jazz musicians felt the same way: 

 an individual performance was unique and practically sacred — in free improvisation there is no “composition,” not even a loosely scored one — but preserving a live gig on tape permanently was tantamount to trapping a butterfly under glass, or worse. In Bailey’s words: “The point of a record is that you can play it again[…] It’ll all eventually become mood music, right?”

https://lareviewofbooks.org/review/performance-anxiety/

 

 

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Experimental music is alive and well in Louisville and many musicians and composers today take pre-recorded material and manipulate them in real time.  It seems that recording, after becoming so stylized in itself, is now coming full circle. One of my questions for David Grubbs tomorrow: Where do we go from here? 

 

Tune in to artxfm.com at 1pm EST to hear excerpts from the book, Q&A with Grubbs, and local experimental tracks.

David Grubbs will then be at Dreamland tomorrow evening to have an open discussion with Tim Barnes and play a solo set.  Tickets are avail: 

Thursday, April 17th
at DREAMLAND
7 PM Doors
$10 General Admission; Advance Online Tickets available here:http://www.ticketfly.com/event/530791-records-ruin-landscape-louisville/.
$35 VIP Admission (includes autographed copy of Records Ruin the Landscape plus reserved seating); Advance Online VIP Tickets available here: http://www.ticketfly.com/event/530793-records-ruin-landscape-louisville/

http://dreamlandislouisville.org

 

Also Happening in Literary Louisville this week:

  Jeffersonville Township Public Library will be hosting an Author Fair on Thursday, April 17th from 3-7 p.m. to celebrate National Library Week. 35 authors will be in attendance selling/signing their work and undoubtedly fielding any intelligent questions. Those authors attending include New York Times best selling authors Karen Robards, Alanna Nash and Nancy Jensen, as well as several celebrated local authors, including Barry Bernson, John Boel, David Domine, Bob Hill, Fred Minnick, Susan Reigler, and Dale Moss. Help make this event a success by spreading the word and making an effort to attend.J

Come celebrate all things LOCAL. All ORIGINAL. All FREE. $25 Cash Giveaway

DOUBLE FEATURE!
**Music by Kevin DeVore**
**Art/Photography by Jinn Fuller Renfro**.

Music – Stories – Poems
Bring yours and get in on the act for a chance to win $25 cash!
Open Mic Signups: 6 p.m.

This week in Literary Louisville: Women:Whiskey:War

The first two on the list are much more pleasant than the last, but if you plan your Tuesday [3.18] accordingly, you could have it all in one day. 

Crescent Hill Library hosts author Pamela J. Olsen on Tuesday, March 18th,  with an author forum for the release of her book, “Fast Times in Palestine.”   4:30p 

http://www.pamolson.org

With dizzying speed she found herself attending Yasser Arafat’s funeral, tour-guiding Israeli friends around the West Bank, dating a Palestinian from a conservative village, being held at gunpoint and injured by a stun grenade, and witnessing the 2005 Disengagement from inside the Gaza Strip. The gripping narrative focuses not only on violence, terror, and politics but also on the daily rounds of house parties, concerts, barbecues, weddings, jokes, harvests, and romantic drama that happen in between.

 

It’s just a short drive from Crescent Hill to E. Market Street where Decca will be celebrating Whiskey and Women with a cocktail party and book signing by Fred Minnick, author of “Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey.”  6-8p

Imagehttp://www.louisville.com/content/decca-hosts-whiskey-women-book-signing 

 

 

Local writing contests

Most of us write for the process; to learn about ourselves and the world around us.  With that mentality in mind, the process is enough. However, a thrilling bonus is to have your writing out in the big bright world for others to experience and hopefully learn something as well. A collective process can certainly shed more light than a scattered array of island writers.  Here are some local opportunities to get your work out there so we can all commune with words.  

 Two of Cups Press: editor, Lee Anne Hornfeldt

               hosting their Inaugural chapbook contest. The reading period is from March 1- May 1                 2014. One winning manuscript announced July 1st (2014).  Details at  http://twoofcupspress.wordpress.com/chapbookcontest/

   A Narrow Fellow: editors, Molly McCormick & Mark Lee Webb

              Fall Poetry and Art Issue. Reading January 2 – April 1 (2014)  guidelines:       http://www.anarrowfellow.com/submit.html

  Gonzofest: committee head, Nick Garing 

               Literary submissions due March 20th. email NPGARING@mac.com

These are current and upcoming deadlines. I will try to keep up to date with these as they arise.

The Louisville Review takes submissions anytime

http://www.louisvillereview.org 

Happy writing, 

Rachel 

Ellen Beirkett Morris on KLL Radio 8-22

I’m happy to announce that Thursday’s guest will be local author Ellen Birkett Morris.

We will discuss her latest book, talk literature, and Ellen will fill us in on some exciting new community programs happening this fall. Tune in Thursday at 1pm to http://www.artxfm.com to hear the broadcast!

 

Ellen’s biographical info:

“Ellen Birkett Morris writes poetry, fiction and short plays from her home in Louisville, Kentucky. Her fiction is forthcoming in Antioch Review, and has appeared in South Carolina Review, Notre Dame Review, and Santa Fe Literary Review. Her story, “The Cycle of Life and Other Incidentals,” was selected as a finalist in the Glimmer Train Press Family Matters short story competition. Her ten-minute play, “Lost Girls,” was a finalist for the 2008 Heideman Award given by Actors Theatre of Louisville and was given a staged reading at the Arnoff Center in Cincinnati. Morris is the author of Surrender, a poetry chapbook from Finishing Line Press. Her poetry is forthcoming in Thin Air Magazine and Clackamas Literary Review, and has appeared in journals including Alimentum, Juked, Inscape, and Gastronomica. Her work won top poetry prize in The Binnacle Ultra-Short Edition in 2008 and was Semi-finalist for Rita Dove Poetry Award. Her poem, Origins, was nominated for the 2006 Pushcart Prize. Morris has received grants from the Elizabeth George Foundation, Kentucky Foundation for Women and Kentucky Arts Council. She is a recipient of a 2013 Al Smith Fellowship for her fiction given by the Kentucky Arts Council.”

KLL Radio 8/17 with Local Author Nadeem Zeman

tomorrow 8/17 at 1pm I’m happy to welcome local author Nadeem Zeman to read some of his short fiction and talk about working at Carmichael’s books and attending UofL for graduate work in writing. Nadeem has a story forthcoming in a national journal and lots of stories to tell about local and visiting literary luminaries, so tune in tomorrow on http://www.artxfm.com !

Poet and WFPL Radio Personality Erin Keane on ARTxFM, 1pm Today!

(NOTE:   Keep Louisville Literary streams live on http://www.artxfm.com at 1pm Thursdays)

Hello readers,

Today I’ll welcome WFPL’s Erin Keane to the studio to discuss the show she recently produced: “Unbound: Ficiton on the Radio” in which authors like Brian Leung, Frank Bill, Silas House, Tessa Mellas, Claire Vaye Watkins and others read their stories in their own voices.

Erin is also a wonderful poet, and we will discuss her work past and present, including her new collection forthcoming from Typecast Publishing. As a preview, I’m linking this poet on poet interview we did last year. I say we because she literally turned the tables, hence the dual format. I hope you’ll tune in today to http://www.artxfm.com at 1pm to hear all about Erin’s new endeavors to Keep Louisville Literary!