Lee Pennington, Jill Baker, and Appalachian Newground [5.24.16]

Lee Pennington’s latest book of Poetry and stories, Appalachian Newground, Illustrated by Jill Baker, is the first book in 23 years and marks his 20th published.  He is 2 time Pulitzer nominee and Former Poet Laureate of Kentucky. Lee and Jill will both be joining me on the radio hour this Tuesday, 9am, on 97.1 WXOX louisville, artxfm.com (global).

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“Those of us who know and love Lee Pennington’s work have waited 23 years for this book, and it was well worth the wait! Appalachian Newground , his twentieth book, holds the universe between its covers in the poems and short stories. You do not have to be from Appalachia to relate to the contents. He honors the land and people everywhere. There is something for each reader that will illuminate the mind, warm the heart, and touch the soul forever. It is beautifully illustrated by renowned artist, Jill Baker. Lee was Poet Laureate of Kentucky in 1984 and was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. This book will undoubtedly earn him another nomination! This is a book you must buy and keep close at hand when you need to read something beautiful and inspirational!” -Roberto Brown, Amazon Review 

LEE PENNINGTON is the author of 19 books including I knew a Woman (1977 Love Street Books) and Thigmotropism (1993 Green River Writers/Grex Press)–both nominated for Pulitzer Prize. He has had over 1300 poem published in more than 300 magazines in America and abroad. In 1984 he was designated Poet Laureate of Kentucky by the state legislature. He has had nine plays produced, wrote the script for The Moonshine War (MGM, 1970, starring Alan Alda, Richard Widmark, etc.), and has published thousands of articles in everything from Playgirl to Mountain Life and Work. Since 1990, through his video production company, JoLe Productions (joleproductions.com), Lee, along with his late wife, Joy, produced 23 documentaries including In Search of the Mudmen (1990), Wales: History in Bondage (1995), and Secret of the Stones (1998), Eyes that Look at the Sky: The Mystery of Easter Island (2001), The Mound Builders (2001), The Serpent Fort: Solving the Mystery of Fort Mountain, Georgia (2005), Let Me Not Drown on the Waters: Fred Rydholm, Michigan’s “Mr. Copper”(2008), Sometimes You Clean, Sometimes You Litter: The Amazing Warner Sizemore (2012), Room to Fly: Anne Caudill’s Album (2013). Lee is a graduate Berea College in KY and the University of Iowa. He holds two Honorary Doctor degrees: Doctor of Literature from World University, and Doctor of Philosophy in Arts from The Academy of Southern Arts and Letters. He taught for nearly 40 years, the last 32 as Professor of English and creative writing at University of Kentucky Jefferson Community College until he retired in 1999 He has traveled extensively (in all the United States, all the Canadian Provinces except one, and in 78 foreign countries). He lives with artist Jill Baker in Kratz House, a designated historic home, in Middletown, KY. For the past six years, he has served as president of the Ancient Kentucke Historical Association, a group dedicated to the study and research of pre-Columbian contact in the Americas. In June of 2013 the University of Louisville in Kentucky dedicated and opened THE LEE AND JOY PENNINGTON CULTURAL HERITAGE GALLERY which houses Pennington’s body of work.  Link to Lee’s Documentaries
Jill Baker’s driving force in life is to show the beautifully complex design of the world. The softness or power of color and light she observes is so much more than meets the eye, that it is only through realism, either impressionistic or hard edge, that a painting can approach it.
“I began creating art when I about 2 years old. According to my mother, I spent hours a day and used up reams of paper drawing quietly by myself throughout my childhood.
“I was driven to try to recreate what I saw. I was determined to capture the beautiful things I saw around me. Others saw what I did and encouraged me. My grandmother was a prolific artist and created big, impressionistic paintings of ladies on patios, and landscapes with dark woods and open plains with mountains. Teachers in schools made me take art; my mother saw that I had painting lessons all during my teens. My high school art teacher threatened that if I didn’t have a picture on the front of Post Magazine when I grew up that he would come back at night and rattle the paintbrushes in my studio.
“In high school I was called upon to create posters and program covers. Everyone in my class asked me to draw them. I helped make backdrops and paintings for school assemblies and hundreds of charity auctions. I realized that, along with the talent I had, came responsibilities.
“As I grew older, I felt guilty when I didn’t have the time to paint, raising children in Bowling Green, Kentucky. But I was driven to return to creating art, driven by the thousands of visual images in my head that needed to be put down on paper or painted.
“In the early 1970’s I was asked if I would like to illustrate a book for Jim Wayne Miller, and then for Frank Steele. Following the publication of those books, I was asked by Love Street Books to design a cover for a prize-winning book of poetry for Bruce Rogers, Minoan Starships. In Louisville, Lee Pennington saw my illustrations in Jim Wayne Miller’s book and asked his publisher if he could ask me to design the cover of his book of poetry called Songs of Bloody Harlan. I did that and it turned out beautifully – a large block print of a man standing on an Appalachian ridge, while the evil ghost of Bloody Harlan swirls around him and the pine trees he stands with. I then was asked to illustrate a few other books by Lee Pennington and he and Joy developed a friendship with my husband and me. We visited them and they us over the years, exchanging Christmas cards every year, with me always surprised to find my images printed on the front of Lee’s cards, to illustrate his yearly poem. Eventually, when I was single and Lee’s wife of 49 years died, we got together and now live in Louisville in Kratz House.
As a young mother and faculty wife, I showed my work in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and gradually to a wider audience in Kentucky. The State of Kentucky chose my work to hang in the capital and called me an official ‘Kentucky Artist.’ I was chosen to exhibit my work in Paris at a major exhibition of American Art. My work was at the Speed Museum in Louisville and, after attending the Academia di Belle Arti and having a solo show at the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence, Italy I enjoyed a one-person show at the Parthenon in Nashville and a major show at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea.”
“I eventually moved to the SoHo district of New York City and earned my M.F.A. from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, in Painting, in 1981. I use a variety of techniques in painting, from Old Masters’ to Impressionistic. The oil paintings I have been doing lately are impressionistic landscapes on canvas.
“But I have continued to illustrate books of poetry and prose and illustrated three of my own books, My Turn, Poems of Accord and Satisfaction and Elba Journal. The last book I illustrated, of course, is Lee’s new book of poetry, Appalachian Newground.”

 If you would like to keep up with literary events in the city, Please visit and subscribe to 502litnews, curated by the Louisville Literary Arts Board, and tune into the radio hour every Tuesday on 97.1 WXOX, artxfm.com. If you have a reading or book release in the Louisville area and would like to appear on the show, please email keeplouisvilleliterary@yahoo.com.

 

Write on,
Rachel Short, Host

Tina Parker @ ‘Flying out Loud’

 

“Tina grew up in Bristol, Virginia, and now lives in Berea, Kentucky, with her husband and two young daughters. She is the author of the poetry chapbook Another Offering (Finishing Line Press, 2015) and the full-length poetry collection Mother May I (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2016). Her individual poems have been published in Appalachian Heritage, Now & Then, Still: The Journal, Rattle, and PMS: poemmemoirstory. In 2013, she received an Artist Enrichment grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women.”

Bio pulled From Tina’s website: HERE 

Tina will be on the radio hour on Tuesday, April 26th- 9am @ 97.1 FM [Louisville, KY] or artxfm.com across the globe.

We will be discussing her book, “Mother May I” and her Louisville reading for the Flying out Loud series that happens the second Monday of each month, 6pm, Sunergos Coffee. Tina will be back in town for the May reading, May 9th.

“In her debut collection Mother May I, poet Tina Parker writes about the universal worries and joys of motherhood with exacting insight–and an admirable lack of sentimentality. Her poems charm while seesawing through unflinching accounts of day-to-day family life and the honest ecstasy of a new motherhood, all more deeply felt after reading poems on miscarriage and fertility doctors. In the tradition of Wordsworth, Parker’s poems parent us all through “real language” of every day steeped in “vivid sensation.”

—Kathleen Driskell, poet, author of the best-selling Seed Across Snow and Kentucky Voices selection Next Door to the Dead”

Mackenzie Berry + Young Poets of Louisville

Mackenzie Berry, a senior at duPont Manual High School, is Founder and Executive Director of Young Poets of Louisville, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides a safe space for young people ages 13-19 to develop themselves through free writing workshops, youth poetry slams, and public readings. An alumnus of the Governor’s School for the Arts and the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, she organized and won the Louisville Youth Philanthropy Council’s first ever Poetic Philanthropy Youth Slam held at the 21c Museum in May 2015. She was the Poet Laureate of Thrivals 8.0 of the Louisville Idea Festival and has been featured on NPR through a segment on Young Poets of Louisville. Mackenzie is currently working on a chapbook entitled “Child’s Play” and plans to create various bodies of work in time to come

mackenzie berry

I will be interviewing Mackenzie on Tuesday at 9am on the radio hour: Keep Louisville Literary, 97.1 FM , WXOX  or live stream here 


The final slam in March will be held at the Speed Art Museum (2035 S. 3rd St.). The slams also feature a young guest artist in a supportive and artistic environment. Admission is $5.

  • Youth must be in high school or between the ages of
    13-19 in order to slam.
  • Each participant must sign up at least one day prior to the slam here.
  • Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
  • Those participating in the slam should arrive no later than 6:45 p.m.

The top three winners of each slam will be able to participate in the Young Poets Final Slam in March which will determine the six young people who make the team that is seeking to represent Louisville at the Brave New Voices International Poetry Festival this summer in Washington, D.C. from July 12th-16th.

You can find the Young Poets of Louisville’s website here

Ryan Ridge + American Homes

ryan ridge.pngRyan Ridge is the author of the story collection Hunters & Gamblers, the poetry collection Ox, as well as the chapbooks 22nd Century Man and Hey, it’s America. His next book, American Homes, is forthcoming from the University of Michigan Press as part of their new 21st Century Prose series. His work can be found in places like PANK, Salt Hill, Tin House, McSweeney’s Small Chair, FLAUNT Magazine, The Santa Monica Review, Sleepingfish, and others. A former editor for Faultline Journal of Arts & Letters, Bull and others, he currently serves as a managing editor for Juked (http://www.juked.com). Ridge holds a BA in English from the University of Louisville and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of California, Irvine.

Join us on 97.1 fm [Louisville] Tuesday Morning, 9am, to hear excerpts from the book. As we discuss Ryan’s writing and the inspiration that comes from the Union of states in which we reside, we might come to the conclusion of our greatness or our impending doom.

wXoXReMixGray8Not in Louisville, KY? no worries! stream live at artxfm.com

“Ryan Ridge inflects his anatomy of suburban interiors with a madcap, panoptic conceptualist idiom, and his readers will be left feeling they never gave nearly enough thought to the stuff that real, lived life comprises: walls, floors, doors, windows, garages, sheds, attics and basements. Ostensibly a tongue-in-cheek meditation satirizing the homogenization of contemporary domestic space, American Homes develops a truly heterogeneous literary architecture founded on the basis of formal dynamism and linguistic play.”––Evan Lavender-Smith
AMERICAN HOMES
“Ridge’s book explores the contradictions inherent in ideals of affluence and ownership, and does so admirably, without edging into sourness or satirical revenge killing. The humor is affable, and odd. Somewhere between Demetri Martin and Steven Wright, Jacques Tati and Wes Anderson, Ramon Gomez de la Serna and Georges Perec.”–Kyle Coma-Thompson, Electric Lit

To see more reviews and make a purchase, browse his catalogue, or simply give the website some hits, please visit: HIS WEBSITE HERE 

After you listen to the Radio hour, you may be so inspired that you would like to study craft with Ryan. YOU CAN= Saturday, March 12th

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS:
A CRAFT CLASS WITH
RYAN RIDGE
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2016
9:30 AM to Noon
PYRO GALLERY
900 E. MARKET STREET, LOUISVILLE, KY
$30 per persons
In this workshop, with prose stylist Ryan Ridge, participants will explore works by Ron Carlson, Elizabeth Tallent, and Ernest Hemingway with an eye toward their inventive use of objects to tell a story. Using this prose as inspiration, writers will create their own “set piece” story–one in which the smallest of salient details can have big, big meaning. The workshop may also appeal to poets looking to write short prose.
Pre-registration required
Log-on to Louisville Literary Arts’ website Scroll down to find the Pay Pal button!

UP next on keep Louisville Literary: Mackenzie Berry, organizer of the “Young Poets of Louisville” organization [March 15th]

Plus ++ Christopher McCurry [March 29th]

If you would like to appear on the radio hour, Contact Rachel Short at keeplouisvilleliterary@yahoo.com

show FLYER

 

Write on,

Rachel Short

 

 

 

Jericho Brown+InKY @ the Local Speed + LLA workshop + The radio hour gets a new time slot

Jericho Brown, one of five winners of the 80th annual Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards, a juried prize that recognizes how literature can advance ideas about race, culture, ethnicity and shared humanity, will be visiting Louisville this week. He will be visiting Central High School for a lecture and Master Class with creative writing students and teachers. Then Mr. Brown will kick off the first InKY of the season with Louisville novelist, Kirby Gann.

The InKY reading series usually takes place at The Bardstown, but will be at the Local Speed for this round to accommodate a larger crowd.  There will be no open mic.

The Local Speed is located at 822 E. Market Street.

January 8th     7-9 pm

Jericho Brown’s website HERE

Kirby Gann’s website HERE 

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Saturday, January 9th

From the Louisville Literary Arts

Sign up for a query letter workshop on Saturday, January 9, from 9:30 to 11:30 at PYRO Gallery

“Mastering Your Query,” will be an informative, participative and productive query-letter workshop with literary agent, Alice Speilburg. Alice will discuss the structure of a query letter, tricks to improve it and tactics to avoid. Group members will write (or revise) a query letter for a book, and will receive in-class instruction and peer critiques. The goal of this workshop is to help participants create a polished query letter they’ll be proud to send to agents and publishers.

Thanks to our artist friends at PYRO Gallery, at 909 E. Market Street, for loaning their creative space for this LLA workshop.

Pre-registration is required for this workshop— $30 per person. Pay by credit card. Or, send a check to Louisville Literary Arts at 1860 Mellwood Ave, Studio 123, Louisville, KY 40206

Alice is a literary agent at Speilburg Literary Agency and has worked in publishing since 2008. She is a member of Romance Writers of America, Mystery Writers of America, and Society of Children’s Book Authors and Illustrators, and she is a board member of Louisville Literary Arts. She is currently building her client list and represents a wide range of fiction and nonfiction. For more information, please visit her website: or connect with her on Twitter @AliceNicoleH.

And Finally, The Keep Louisville Literary radio hour on artxfm.com has moved to a new time slot starting this Tuesday, 9am

for now keep dialing into the website. but oh so soon will we hit your car radio on 97.1 WXOX

image from emorywheel.com

The Lipstick Wars and the Slam Resurgence in Louisville

From Sweet Peaches and KMAC poetry Slams to Floetic Friday youth slam and the VerbalArt Affair, spoken word poetry is a experiencing a resurgence in the city of Louisville. Such a resurgence that the Southern Fried competition will grace our presence in 2016 from the hard work of Lance G. Newman.  There’s a handful of hosts and artists pushing spoken word/slam into each corner of the city: Robin G with the Verbal Art Affair, which was started by Madison West and James Lee, Sweet peaches and KMAC with Lance Newman and Maxwell Sounds plus  Rheonna Thorton most recently organized and all women’s  slam competition called the Lipstick Wars.

In coalition with Arts Outreach and various charitable donations for refreshments and door prizes, Rheonna asked around until she landed the Bomhard Theatre in the Kentucky Center for Performing Arts.  A deal in itself the 600+ theatre nearly filled for the free event. Twelve women poets battled with words through three rounds of poetry in front of five judges.  The judges didn’t take their position lightly.  Rheonna plans for this event to be bi-annual and eventually host workshops for girls to empower their voice. So the judges scored accordingly and took the slam seriously by listening for imagery and craft in the performances. Contestants lost points for reading their work or not including poetic elements. The judges were booed several times as Slam encourages response throughout performance and scoring. In the same vein, points were awarded for engaging the audience and dynamics.

The top three poets were Tessa Gartin, Jazzy J, and Mizz Quoted

Tune in Thursday to artxfm.com at 1pm to hear Tessa Gartin talk about the experience and share some of her pieces. plus recordings from the competition.

Slam often doesn’t get a nod from academia in the writing community because at times craft isn’t celebrated and the pieces can head into the direction of rants with end rhyme. However, it can be done well and is being done well by a handful of poets in this city.

Look for the lipstick wars to come back in the spring of 2016

The event was so popular Miss Rheonna might have to have a preliminary round.

This weekend:

Floetic Friday, youth poetry slam

  • at 7:00pm – 9:00pm
  • 822 E Market St, Louisville, Kentucky 40206
  • Young Poets of Louisville will be holding its first youth poetry slam of the year on October 16, 2015 at the Local Speed Museum. To perform you must be between the ages of 13-19. There will also be a young guest artist featured in a supportive and artistic environment. Admission is $5 at the door. Please come support the power of the youth voice in friendly compeition!

Homegrown Music Art and Spoken Word

If you want to live in the moment, come out to Cedar Grove Coffee House Oct. 16 and get yourself a Homegrown infusion. In celebration of Halloween, we’ll be having a scary good time singing, slamming, reading, and sharing our art. There’ll be drumming and strumming and humming and big noises and tiny sounds. Plus, brilliant poetry by Tom C. Hunley and stunning art by Jason Kelty.

See why people call us the best breakout venue for open-mic performers in the state, maybe in the whole country! Shake off your stage fright and come join us. Bring your original tunes. Tell us how your heart aches. Show us what 30 days in rehab looks like. Give us a glimpse of something beautiful. Give us laughter. Move us to tears. Make us feel and think and breathe and love again.

ALL ORIGINAL. NO COVER FEE. $25 Cash Giveaway

DOUBLE FEATURE!
**Art by Jason Kelty**
**Spoken Word by Tom C. Hunley**

Music – Stories – Poems
Bring yours and get in on the act for a chance to win $25 cash!

Open Mic Signups: starting at 5:45 p.m.

*Due to language and mature themes, the show is recommended for ages 16 and up.

American Fantastic presents The Cottonwood Curse and other spooky stories and poems

American Fantastic is hosting a night of stories both ghastly and ghoulish. Hear the tale of “The Cottonwood Curse”, a story of Victorian Old Louisville, and sins from the past that give the neighborhood its haunted legacy. Want to weave a tale of your own? We’ll have an open-mic for people who want to tell their own scary stories, poems and songs.

We’ll be hosting the event at the Sunergos at 306 W Woodlawn Ave in the Iroquois neighborhood of Louisville.

ArtFM Radio hour: March 5.2015 : Nettie Farris : Matthew Haughton : Jonathan Wood

Tune in HERE this Thursday 1pm EST

Readings and Q&A with Nettie Farris and Matthew Haughton

stand_in_stillness-2CoverforCommunion-2

Musical interludes by Jonathan Wood

When you dig it:  You can then see them collaborate LIVE at Subterranean Phrases

on March 11 @ Decca [812 e. market st ] EVENT PAGE HERE

Subterranean Phrases is a reading series that matches writers and musicians to perform unrehearsed collaborations creating interesting juxtapositions of verbal and musical phrases. It’s subterranean in the cellar lounge at Decca Restaurant.

Can’t wait until March 11th to hear some incredible local readings?  I don’t blame you. Fear not. the Portland Poetry Series happens on MONDAY, March 2ND @ McQuixote Books and Coffee with 4 FOUR outstanding writers. 

Amber Burns : Adam Day : Jeremy Clark : Yolantha Harrison-Pace

Epiphany 

EVENT PAGE HERE 

All bios below


Nettie Farris is the author of Communion (Accents Publishing, 2013). She teaches writing as an adjunct instructor and has earned a Distinguished Teaching Award from the College of Arts and Sciences University of Louisville. She has won first place prizes in both Graduate Poetry and Graduate Research from the Metroversity Writing Contest. In 2011 she received the Kudzu Poetry Prize. Her poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She lives in Floyds Knobs, Indiana. Her chapbook, Fat Crayons, is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press.

Matthew Haughton’s latest book of poetry is “Stand in the Stillness of Woods” (WordTech Editions). His chapbook, “Bee-coursing Box” (Accents Publications) was nominated for the Weatherford Award for Appalachian Poetry Book of the Year. His poems have appeared in many journals including Appalachian Heritage, The Four Way Review, Still, Border Crossing, and The Louisville Review. He is currently a student at the Bread Loaf School of English, where he is on a generous fellowship from the C.E. and S. Foundation. Haughton works as a school teacher in his native Kentucky.

http://jonathanglenwood.bandcamp.com/

From songwriter to improviser, Jonathan Glen Wood answers creativity’s call with openness and honesty, seeking clarity on an important inner journey. Whether performing with Old Baby, Jaye Jayle, Lowe Sutherland or Catherine Irwin, Wood strives to find new modes of creative expression, which lead to new musical possibilities. After a wide range of solo releases in 2014 ultimately uniting folk songwriting and synthesizer tones, he’s started 2015 by releasing, “On Remembering,” a wholly instrumental ambient synthesizer affair.


Amber Burns was born and raised in Louisville, KY. She earned her BA in English and Pan-African Studies from the University of Louisville. Amber first began performing her poetry in 2008 as a member of the feminist choreo-poetry troupe, S.H.E.! (Solidifying Her Evolution). She is now a seasoned poet and uses the stage as a platform to discuss the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. Amber is the Assistant Director of New Roots, Inc., a Louisville based non-profit working to make fresh local food affordable for those who need it most.

Jeremy Clark was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky. He recently graduated from the University of Louisville with a degree in Pan-African Studies. In 2014, he was chosen to attend the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and his work is forthcoming in PLUCK! and Callaloo.

Adam Day’s forthcoming collection is Model of City in Civil War (Sarabande Books, April 2015). He is the recipient of a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship for Badger, Apocrypha, and of a PEN Emerging Writers Award. His work has appeared in the Boston Review, American Poetry Review, Poetry London, The Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He coordinates The Baltic Writing Residency in Latvia, Scotland, and Bernheim Arboretum & Research Forest.

Yolantha Harrison-Pace was born in Tacoma, Washington, but lived her early childhood in Amarillo, Texas during segregation until her family moved to Champaign, Illinois in 1966. There integration became a part of her everyday life, often just because her family of 7 attended an event or she and one of her 4 brothers were the only African American student in the classroom. This unique legacy of having lived on both sides of the track, segregation and integration, has been influential in her love for and artistic portrayals of her precious home, America. Pace uses her art forms as tools and strategies for supporting her platform of unity through the pursuit of cultural excellence. Her focus group emphasis is underserved populations in America and beyond. Yolantha is an advocate for abused family members, especially concerning hate crimes against women and children. She has been a Children’s Ambassador for Haiti since the year 2000. She is a teaching artist, playwright, poet and author and has had her play THE WHOLE SKY premier at Berea College. Her multitude of writings have gleaned her such honors as Poet of the Year, Book of Poetry of the Year, and won her the personal accolade of Humanitarian Author of the year. Her works have gone international through her postings as an adjunct writer for University of Southern California’s Art Institute for Genetic Medicine. In addition, as an Urban Folk Artist, Pace’s primitive Angel dolls are owned by collectors around the world. Her newest release: UNCLE THAXTER is a children’s book celebrating friends and family of wounded warriors.